Bright Spots: Lighting for Tomorrow 2015 Winners Announced

Sheila Kim Sheila Kim

In its 13th year, the American Lighting Association’s “Lighting for Tomorrow” competition once again sought out innovative new residential products — from bulbs and fixtures to controls — that bridge the gaps between consumer expectations, design, and energy efficiency. Among the submissions, some of the noticeable trends included an uptick in fixtures and kits that include dimming features, more products that consider the lighting needs of the senior population, and growing interest in vintage-style filament LED lamps — the latter of which is reflected in three of the winning products. Presented at the association’s annual conference in Huntington Beach, Calif. earlier this month, the awards went to:

Acuity Brands: CHALINA Pendant
Five OLED panels attach to a variable stem to create a sort of budding flower effect. With an output of 342.2 lumens and white color temperature of 2,979 Kelvin, the pendant is available in three finishes: brushed nickel, semi-gloss white, and champagne.


From left: Acuity Brands; AFX

AFX: Ambrose Pendant
This simple luminaire design evokes a cross between a lampshade and drum pendant, measures 24 inches in diameter, and can be adjusted in height up to six feet. The shade is available in mocha linen or louver resin, and the 1,057-lumen LED lamping can be dimmed from 0 to 10 volts.


Blackjack Lighting

Blackjack Lighting: Wedge LED Chandelier
Providing both up- and down-lighting to fully illuminate spaces, this contemporary chandelier utilizes multiple trapezoidal LED panels to direct the light. The chandelier measures 24 inches in diameter and produces 2,432 lumens with a white color temperature of 2,938 Kelvin.


Bulbrite Industries (also shown at top)

Bulbrite Industries: LED Filament Series
As mentioned previously, the vintage filament look using an LED source has grown into a hot category in recent years. Among them, Bulbrite’s series offers every type of shape commonly desired in exposed lamping situations, from candelabra (E12) style to basic Edison A-lamp.

Civilight: Professional 3W Crystal Candelabra
This Energy Star qualified LED candelabra bulb features a patented optical clear cover that produces an elegant ambiance, whether used in sconces, chandeliers, or other fixtures. It has an output of 223,78 lumens and color temperature of 2,686 Kelvin.


From left: Civilight; Designers Fountain’s Lucienne Wall Sconce

Designers Fountain: Lucienne Pendant and Wall Sconce
Two decorative fixtures from Designers Fountain of the same series walked away winners. A pendant and sconce from the Lucienne collection were each recognized for their blend of playfulness and sophistication. In both designs, handmade plated-glass droplets are lit from an LED source above and complemented by Luxor Gold-finished components.

Fanimation: fanSync
fanSync is a mobile app that communicates with proprietary hardware via Bluetooth technology to control ceiling-fan functions such as speed, direction, and integrated lighting (if applicable). It also enables timer modes and away-from-home settings. The fanSync hardware is compatible with the majority of brand models.


From left: Fanimation; GE Lighting’s 100W Replacement and 3-Way Bulbs

GE Lighting: 100W Replacement General Purpose Bulb and Soft White LED 30–70–100W Replacement Three-Way Bulb
LED replacement bulbs for consumers scored big in this competition. Among them, two winning products came from GE Lighting. The 100W replacement uses only 16 watts to produce an impressive 1,600 lumens and has a projected lifespan of 25,000 hours. Meanwhile, the three-way replacement has an output of 400/1,050/1,600 lumens while only using a maximum of 16.15 watts.

Generation Brands: LED Bi-pin Replacement Module
Another replacement bulb, this LED lamp fits bi-pin sockets and was made in partnership with LED pioneer SORAA. The 537-lumen product offers full spectrum color rendering, consumes only eight watts, and has a life expectancy of 35,000 hours.


From left: Generation Brands; Green Creative

Green Creative: BR30 Cloud 11W High CRI GU24 Lamp
This BR30 LED replacement is Energy Star certified and uses 35 percent less material than previous generations, resulting in a light, manageable weight of four ounces. It has an 843.23-lumen output while using just under 11 watts.


Holtkötter

Holtkötter: PLANO Torchiere 9901*LED
An edgy take on the torchiere floor lamp, PLANO sports a minimalist disc-shaped head that incorporates LED lamping and an acrylic lens to produce 3,578 lumens of warm white light. The 72¾-inch-tall luminaire features a touch dimmer that clicks on or off.


Juno Lighting Group

Juno Lighting Group: Aculux Tunable White 3¼-inch Precision Recessed Luminaires
This recessed fixture offers tunable white light to produce any color temperature between 2,000 and 4,350 Kelvin as needed for different functions and activities. The light angle can be adjusted or directed, and downlight and wall-wash trim options are available.


From left: LBL Lighting’s Auri and Xterna (closed and expanded)

LBL Lighting: Auri and Xterna
Two stunners from LBL demonstrated that efficiency and whimsy can coexist. Auri takes its shape from the typical consumer electronic ear bud with an oval-shaped LED source that can rotate 360 degrees, as well as pivot 350. It produces 349.1 lumens while consuming a little over eight watts. Meanwhile, the Xterna LED suspension luminaire recalls classic elevator gates in a white or satin nickel finish. Extendable from seven to 76 inches, it has an output of 1,896 lumens while using 42.93 watts.


Legrand

Legrand: adorne Tru-Universal SofTap Dimmer
With its attractive minimalist aesthetic, the Tru-Universal SofTap Dimmer provides a more tactile experience for users, allowing them to lightly tap the switch to control the lighting. An LED backlight indicates lighting levels on the switch itself. Measuring 1.77 by 4.19 inches, it comes in a wide variety of colors and finishes to suit any style environment.


From left: MaxLite’s LED Filament Lamps and LED Adjustable Downlight Retrofit

MaxLite: LED Filament Lamps and LED Adjustable Downlight Retrofit
In addition to vintage filament styles and shapes, MaxLite offers an LED A-lamp with a half-chrome bowl to redirect light upward into pendants and prevent downward glare. The manufacturer was also recognized for its LED Adjustable Downlight Retrofit, which not only boasts efficiency at 9.7 watts, but additionally has a sunset dimming capability. The lens rotates up to 355 degrees and tilts up to 30 degrees vertically.


Satco

Satco: LED Filament Lamps
Another winner in the LED filament bulb arena, this series offers omnidirectional light that is dimmable. Clear- and vintage-glass finishes are available.


Tech Lighting’s Element Merge Recessed Linear System

Tech Lighting: Element Merge Recessed Linear System and Build-Your-Own Multiples
Allowing for high customization, the Element line won awards for two products in the series. The Merge Recessed Linear System can be configured in numerous grid and row layouts to direct light where needed, and is easily plastered in to disappear into the architecture. Two styles of spot heads are available for the modules, and the LEDs produce 855 lumens while using just over nine watts.


Tech Lighting’s Element Build-Your-Own Multiples

Similarly, Element Build-Your-Own Multiples allows configuration with recessed or surface-mount spot modules that are provided with frame blanks and plaster plates for mudding into the ceiling for a seamless appearance. The modules offer tool-free tilting up to 35 degrees and rotation up to 360 degrees.

© craig sheppard photographer

Queensway // Ayre Chamberlain Gaunt

Southampton, United Kingdom

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