© Casati

The Modern Gable: 7 A-Frame Homes Perched Among Meadows, Mountains and Valleys

As adaptations of and odes to the classical “cabins in the woods,” the following projects harness a typology so age-old and familiar, yet render contemporary results.

Jennifer Geleff Jennifer Geleff

Architects: Want to have your work featured on Architizer? Upload your projects to be considered for an editorial feature! Don’t forget to sign up for our inspirational newsletter. 

With extensive adaptations and forms throughout modern architecture, the gable possesses structural elements that allow for picturesque, thoughtful and cozy residential environments. Throughout the following collection, each project is uniquely reminiscent of traditional living, echoing simplicity and functionality, without being nostalgic. As adaptations of and odes to the classical “cabins in the woods,” the following projects harness a typology so age-old and familiar, while also rendering exciting contemporary results.

Beyond just functionality, the architects featured in this collection use the gable’s triangular sloped roof as a geometric tool that guides the gaze, directs sunlight and creates movement within each space. The structure takes endless forms: steeply pitched, dramatic and otherwise. In some cases, the gable hovers over an extremely compact living environment, while in others it is used as a climactic vertical tool for open spaces up to five stories high. Finally, as evident throughout the following imagery, these gables are situated among vastly diverse and breathtaking environments, which span valleys, mountain ranges and lush meadows.

© Yousub Song

© Yousub Song

© Yousub Song

© Yousub Song

© stpmj

© stpmj

© Yousub Song

© Yousub Song

Shear House by stpmj, Yecheon-gun, South Korea

Shear House seeks to explore how a simple typology such as a pitched roof can vastly improve environmental qualities. The structure facilitates a playful experience with changing geometries that are directly responsive to the sun’s orientation. The house has two different sides: an end with a typical gable and another that is sliced and shifted into a monolithic structure.

© Stijn Poelstra

© Stijn Poelstra

© Stijn Poelstra

© Stijn Poelstra

© Stijn Poelstra

© Stijn Poelstra

Recreation House in the Surrounding of Utrecht by Zecc Architecten, Utrecht, Netherlands

Located in a rural area just north of Utrecht, this compact recreation house was realized through a collaboration between Zecc Architecten and interior designer Roel van NorelI. The archetypal cottage is simple — it incorporates a gable roof made of stone slate and wood cladding in Western Red Cedar. Additionally, the design incorporates window shutters that create a fluid façade that opens towards the green garden.

© SoNo arhitekti

© SoNo arhitekti

© SoNo arhitekti

© SoNo arhitekti

© SoNo arhitekti

© SoNo arhitekti

Mountain View Houseby SoNo arhitekti, Austria

Perched near the top of a hill in the Austrian Alps, SoNo arhitekti designed this contemporary cluster of cabins, which offer stunning panoramic views. On the exterior, the gable roofs playfully mimic and echo the surrounding mountains while on the interior, residents feel as if they are floating within a breathtaking and ethereal landscape.

© Personal Architecture

© Personal Architecture

© Personal Architecture

© Personal Architecture

© Personal Architecture

© Personal Architecture

© Personal Architecture

© Personal Architecture

House Robert-Jan and Inge by Personal Architecture, Zevenhuizen, Netherlands

For this project, Personal Architecture created this beautiful new gabled home with sweeping views of the surrounding meadows and the nearby church tower. The design — both charming and bold — harnesses traditional elements such as brick and slate and applies them in a contemporary manner. Inside, the living program is spread over five different stories that are carefully weaved together by a ribbon-like staircase.

© Krischner & Oberhofer

© Krischner & Oberhofer

© Krischner & Oberhofer

© Krischner & Oberhofer

© Atelier Ulrike Tinnacher

© Atelier Ulrike Tinnacher

House Tby Atelier Ulrike Tinnacher, Austria

Through “materiality and formal restraint,” House T forms a gentle whole with the undulating countryside. The new building is comprised of two structures and stands confidently and assured, with its gable facing the valley. The first structure is a small rectangular cube that was built above a 400-year-old vaulted cellar. The second structure, located on the east side, is an orthogonally adjoining structure, which enables the surrounding scenery to diffuse into the building.

© ÁBATON Architects

© ÁBATON Architects

© ÁBATON Architects

© ÁBATON Architects

© ÁBATON Architects

© ÁBATON Architects

Portable Home ÁPH80by ABATON Architects, Madrid, Spain

In 2013 ÁBATON developed the ÁPH80 series: a gabled dwelling that is ideal for two people and can be easily transported almost anywhere. The proportions were realized through extensive study of how to create a feeling of fullness while being indoors. The portable home is comprised of a simple yet sturdy construction, and is made of materials that provide both comfort and balance.

© Casati

© Casati

© Casati

© Casati

© Casati

© Casati

Casa Prè de Sura by Casati, San Martino In Badia, Italy

Located in Italy, this unique gabled house has “stripy wooden walls on the outside and bumpy limestone walls on the inside.” Boxy windows protrude outwards from the façade and frame views towards the Castello di San Martino — a small castle on a nearby hillside. This unassuming building presents a thoughtful design solution for how to forge connection with the surrounding landscape.

Architects: Want to have your work featured on Architizer? Upload your projects to be considered for an editorial feature! Don’t forget to sign up for our inspirational newsletter.

© Ricardo Oliveira Alves Photography

SUSPENDED MATTER BOX // MMVARQUITECTOS

Felgueiras, Portugal

Islamic Vernaculars: 6 Diverse Mosques Made in America

The histories of America’s 1,200 mosques tell the story of Muslim families from around the world, ma ny of whom have lived in the U.S. for centuries.

+