© Superpozycja Architekci

Home Hideouts: 8 Functional Attics Burrowed Across Europe

While clearing, tackling and transforming an attic may be a daunting task, the following projects exhibit no residue of such difficulty.

Jennifer Geleff Jennifer Geleff

This collection features eight apartments that are snug and situated within attics across Europe. Due to their unique construction, attics are sometimes conceptualized as uninhabitable, cramped and unwelcoming. Often squeezed beneath low, pitched roofs with few upright walls for windows, many attics sit idle and untapped for decades, lacking any function other than a dark and cold zone for dust accumulation. While clearing, tackling and transforming an attic may be a daunting task, the following projects exhibit no residue of such difficulty.

Architectural features that unite this set of homes include the implementation of new skylights for increased natural light and exposed wood trusses, which provide an enhanced cabin-like feel. At Loft Apartment, Ruetemple took a previously uninhabitable attic and transformed it into a bright and playful family home. At Attic renovation, Superpozycja Architekci took a space that was formerly cited as “a virtual ruin,” and created a cozy, inviting and polished apartment. Among these projects, architects harness the structural limitations of the attic, and exploit such constraints in order to create interesting and unique design. By utilizing the various challenges that are embedded in attic renovation, the following eight projects take on new vitality and functionality.

© Filip Dujardin Photography

© Filip Dujardin Photography

© Filip Dujardin Photography

© Filip Dujardin Photography

© Filip Dujardin Photography

© Filip Dujardin Photography

House in Bruges by atelier tom vanhee, Bruges, Belgium

A pharmacy occupies the ground floor of this heritage building, which has stood since the 17th century. When the pharmacy required an extension, the above dwelling was also expanded. By connecting the attic to the adjacent dwelling, the architects created an open and light new home, with restored roof trusses as iconic elements in the space.

© Superpozycja Architekci

© Superpozycja Architekci

© Superpozycja Architekci

© Superpozycja Architekci

© Superpozycja Architekci

© Superpozycja Architekci

Attic renovation by Superpozycja Architekci, Gliwice, Poland

For this project, the founders of Superpozycja Architekci took on the challenge of transforming this old attic into a new, modern home. Previously in ruins, the first step was to figure out how to create as much functional space as possible. The architects created a cozy and light-filled interior by implementing as many roof windows as possible. Additionally, they reused wood from the demolition to create new work-spaces and tables.

© Arhitektura

© Arhitektura

© Arhitektura

© Arhitektura

Attic apartment Bledby Arhitektura d.o.o., Bled, Slovenia

Situated in an attic, this apartment was designed with an open floor-plan in order to create maximum living space. Since the apartment has few windows, the architects were challenged with creating sufficient light. Thus, the apartment is united by a custom made 40-foot-long light, which can be switched on and off in sections or in full.

© Alexandra Timpau

© Alexandra Timpau

© Alexandra Timpau

© Alexandra Timpau

© Alexandra Timpau

© Alexandra Timpau

Attic Loft Reconstruction – Prague 6 by B² Architecture, Prague, Czech Republic

In this late 19th-century home, the client sought to create a home that felt like a retreat from his work and frequent business travel. Achieved through a universally white palette and exposed roof trusses, the loft takes on a modern yet lodge-like spirit. The staircase, a steel ribbon structure, acts as a sculptural element in the living and dining areas.

© PLUS ULTRA studio

© PLUS ULTRA studio

© PLUS ULTRA studio

© PLUS ULTRA studio

© PLUS ULTRA studio

© PLUS ULTRA studio

CPR | T-apartment by PLUS ULTRA studio, Milano, Italy

Previously a dental office, PLUS ULTRA studio converted this cramped small space into a functional attic apartment. The architects developed additional natural light by opening two new roof windows and using translucent materials and mirrors.

© f+f architectes

© f+f architectes

© f+f architectes

© f+f architectes

© f+f architectes

© f+f architectes

© f+f architectes

© f+f architectes

The Attic by f+f architectes, Strasbourg, France

This large duplex apartment occupies the attic of an old building in Strasbourg. The project features a restrained material palette and simple, pleasant organization. A large skylight opens up onto the main living area, right at the heart of the apartment.

© Diogo Passarinho

© Diogo Passarinho

© Diogo Passarinho

© Diogo Passarinho

White Attic by Diogo Passarinho, Lisbon, Portugal

For this project, Diogo Passarinho was tasked with designing a family home for a young couple with two babies. The clients specified that they wanted all surfaces to be white, which created a unique opportunity for pops of color through other elements. The upper level of this two-story space — the sleeping area — was transformed to expose existing wooden beams and bring daylight in with three new skylights.

© Ruetemple

© Ruetemple

© Ruetemple

© Ruetemple

© Ruetemple

© Ruetemple

Loft Apartment by Ruetemple, Moscow, Russia

Previously an uninhabitable attic, Ruetemple turned this space into a bright and playful home. Loft Apartment is filled with functional furniture, playrooms for children and ample storage space. The resulting space yields maximum comfort with minimal decor.

© Morgan Studio Architecture & Interiors

Florence Recreation Pavilion // Morgan Studio Architecture & Inte riors

Northampton, MA, United States

© Quang Tran

Nha que // a21 studio

Nha Trang, Vietnam

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