© SacDigiFab

Meta Roofs: 8 Innovative Takes on Vaulted Pavilions

Gabrielle Golenda Gabrielle Golenda

Far from the days of Woodstock, the rise of festival culture has evolved from niche grassroots gatherings to massive multi-faceted events. Growing in scope and size, these art and music focused events have provoked a new typology in ephemeral architecture, spaces that are meant to be experienced in situ: the festival pavilion.

Given that the main function of pavilions is to provide some sort of experiential overhead covering, it makes sense that the emphasis of these structures would be placed on what’s overhead. Via vaulting, these projects show how a little imagination and a large open space can inspire captivating self-referential architecture. From recycled bottles to paper pulp, this collection explores various takes on the arched typology: vaulted pavilions or, if you will, meta roofs.

© Oliver Walker

© Oliver Walker

© Omar Garza

© Omar Garza

© Joshua White JWPictures

© Joshua White JWPictures

Pulp Pavilion by Ball-Nogues Studio, Coachella, California

Built using over a ton of paper pulp, this sinuous orange and purple pavilion was fabricated for Coachella’s music festival. No extraneous chemicals were added to the waste paper construction, so after its two-week stint at the festival most of the structure could be recycled or composted.

© DIGFABMTY1.0

© DIGFABMTY1.0

© DIGFABMTY1.0

© DIGFABMTY1.0

© DIGFABMTY1.0

© DIGFABMTY1.0

DIGFABMTY1.0 by DIGFABMTY1.0, Monterrey, Mexico

A group of 11 students at Tecnologico de Monterrey constructed this parametric pavilion based on an algorithm. The result? A dreamy seating pavilion whose pyramidal-shaped skin rests atop vaulted framework. The digital fabrication project consists of 195 components that were laser-cut and then folded into a pyramidal shape from a single piece of three-millimeter Coroplast.

© MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY

© MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY

© MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY

© MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY

© MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY

© MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY

Vaulted Willow by MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY, Edmonton, Canada

Situated in Borden Park, this vaulted folly is made up of over 721 digitally fabricated aluminum shingles. Fastened into place by 14,043 connectors, the lightweight, thin, and self-supported shingles of three different thicknesses were designed to overlap through their extended tabs and in turn double their material thickness.

Vaulted Cork Pavillon by Pedro de Azambuja Varela, Porto, Portugal

Assembled out of hundreds of CNC-cut blocks, this cork pavilion was designed by students of the Advanced Program in Digital Architecture (CEAAD). Inside and out, the site promotes dynamic fluxes and circulation. The outside functions as a rest area where people can rest on the benches or curvilinear forms, while a tunnel-like space inside forms a quiet shelter complete with exhibition space and a further seating area.

© SacDigiFab

© SacDigiFab

© SacDigiFab

© SacDigiFab

© SacDigiFab

© SacDigiFab

LAUNCH by SacDigiFab, Sacramento, California

Made out of thousands of corrugated cardboard pieces, this temporary public structure was folded and assembled with ordinary white glue and friction fitting. After the structure was taken down, it was donated to local groups, where they used it for weed abatement in organic gardening.

© STUDIOKCA

© STUDIOKCA

© STUDIOKCA

© STUDIOKCA

© STUDIOKCA

© STUDIOKCA

Head In Clouds Pavilionby STUDIOKCA, New York, New York

Featured in a summer-long exhibition on Governors Island, this symbolic pavilion is made out of 53,780 recycled bottles, representing the amount thrown away in NYC in one hour. A series of one-gallon jugs form the exterior, while 16-ounce and 24-ounce bottles line the interior.

© Jos Blom - architectuur & ontwerp

© Jos Blom - architectuur & ontwerp

© Jos Blom - architectuur & ontwerp

© Jos Blom - architectuur & ontwerp

© Max Sabandar GStar Int

© Max Sabandar GStar Int

21panels by Jos Blom, Utrecht, Netherlands

Originally created as part of a temporary installation at the annual Festival a/d Werf, construction of this small wooden house was based on a time-saving prefab system connected by a series of hooks and slots. The name “21panels” is fitting, given that it takes only 21 standard plywood panels to construct each house. With minimal parts and simple detailing, the simple assembly can be constructed in just 30 minutes.

© Folk Architects

© Folk Architects

© Folk Architects

© Folk Architects

© Folk Architects

© Folk Architects

HORTUS by Folk Architects, Melbourne, Australia

Located in the Docklands of Melbourne, this free-standing glass house is the temporary location of Seven Seeds cafe. Resembling a greenhouse, this project features a garden installation by local artist Lauren Berkowitz that showcases native and edible plants.

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© D.I.G Architects

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© modostudio

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Laives, Italy

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