© Jeff Green Photography

Glass Eye Candy: The Many Textures of Nathan Allan Glass

Derek Bangle Derek Bangle

There is an axiom in the world of building design that states a project should be visually arresting at a distance of 100 meters, again at 10 meters, and, yes, even from only one meter away. The latter category is particularly interesting because it goes beyond ‘design’ as an aggregation of materials in a specific arrangement and focuses on the materials themselves. From one meter away, the predominant quality of an architectural piece becomes texture — what we can see with our eyes and our hands.

When it comes to texture that is visually intriguing and offers an equally rich tactile experience, there are few manufacturers that can compete with the breadth and depth of Nathan Allan Glass Studios. The Classic Textures are anything but standard fare — the combinations of patterns and colors are nearly endless, and they look good from any distance. Their products are also well-suited to controlling light and sight, as the Crackle series in particular demonstrates. And as shown by the Convex series and the Glass Tread and Floor, the panels are not reserved for decorating walls — they make for excellent exterior finishes as well as satisfy every need underfoot.

© Jeff Green Photography

© Jeff Green Photography

© Brett Drury Architectural Photography, Inc.

© Brett Drury Architectural Photography, Inc.

© Randy Brown Architects

© Randy Brown Architects

Classic Textures (Kiln-Cast Glass)

The Classic Textures range from sets of wavy lines to overlapping geometric blocks, which give the glass panels a rich visual and tactile texture.

© BÄRBEL MIEBACH

© BÄRBEL MIEBACH

© Jessica Miller

© Jessica Miller

Crackle Series (Kiln-Cast Glass)

Panels consist of glass shards that have been fused together again. Aside from the ice-like texture, the Crackle series has intriguing properties: as the viewing angle becomes more oblique, the panels become opaque.

© Michael Desjardins Photography

© Michael Desjardins Photography

© Michael Desjardins Photography

© Michael Desjardins Photography

Convex Series (Kiln-Cast Glass)

The Convex series features glass panels that have been enlivened by geometric patterns: circles, equilateral triangles, squares, hexagons.

© tvsdesign

© tvsdesign

Crystal Series (Kiln-Cast Glass)

The Crystal series consists of panels which have had thousands of crystal beads fused to the back face that act to diffuse light (they are ideally backlit). This process is often combined with Classic Textures to create a variety of layered effects.

© Perrenoud Productions

© Perrenoud Productions

© Eric Laignel & Hervé Abbadie

© Eric Laignel & Hervé Abbadie

Glass Treads and Flooring (Kiln-Cast Glass)

Glass is a tempting material to use for underfoot — it can make for stunning installation photos. However, Nathan Allan’s treads and flooring are likely to look good long afterward as they are engineered to be slip- and scratch-resistant as well as easy to clean.

Freeform Series (Kiln-Cast Glass)

The Freeform series achieves its dynamic appearance purely via form — the glass itself is entirely clear. Nonetheless, the three-dimensionality of the panels makes them ideal for elegantly guarding the privacy of those behind them.

© Brett Drury Architectural Photography, Inc.

© Brett Drury Architectural Photography, Inc.

© Peter Malinowski/InSite

© Peter Malinowski/InSite

© Roger Hagadone Photography

© Roger Hagadone Photography

Glass Countertops (Kiln-Cast Glass)

No self-respecting upper-echelon watering hole could make do without an arresting glass countertop. If we include lighting as an integral component, the combinations of texture and color are extensive.

© Hacker

Simple Headquarters // Hacker

Portland, OR, United States

© Pedevilla Architects

Alpine Residence & Chalet La Pedevilla // Pedevilla Architects

Province of Bolzano - South Tyrol, Trentino-Alto Adige/South Tyrol, Italy

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