© DCPP arquitectos

Urban Living: 8 Modern Apartment Buildings in Mexico

Jack Hanly Jack Hanly

Mexico is a country that has undergone massive social, economic and political transformations in recent years. An exploding population combined with steady migration from rural into urban areas has prompted unprecedented growth of cities that requires not only more urban housing, but also sensitive design solutions that improve areas of inhabitation. While Mexico has, like almost every country around the globe, had the urban apartment building typology for years, it has taken on renewed importance as the country’s urban residents continue to grow.

The following collection of apartment buildings in Mexico demonstrates the diversity and innovation that architects are bringing to the creation of multi-unit dwellings in cities across the country. From low-rise housing blocks that retain a reserved spatial character to high-rise towers that soar above the cities they inhabit, these Mexican apartment buildings are at the forefront of urban housing for the 21st century.

© Rojkind Arquitectos

© Rojkind Arquitectos

© Jaime Navarro

© Jaime Navarro

High Park by Rojkind Arquitectos, San Pedro Garza García, Mexico

Located on the outskirts of the city of Monterrey surrounded by the Sierra Madres, this apartment and office building features a series of shifting floor plates that reduce sunlight and heat gain, while providing irregular terrace spaces for workers and residents.

© Lopez/Jaimes design studio

© Lopez/Jaimes design studio

© Lopez/Jaimes design studio

© Lopez/Jaimes design studio

Constitucíon 8 by Proyecto Cafeína, Puebla, Mexico

Set in a neighborhood of growing development, the architects of this Puebla apartment building sought to create distinctively individual dwellings within the building by creating staggered offsets in both plan and section. The glass and concrete block materials create a rough yet elevated industrial aesthetic for the loft-style apartments.

Kiral Apartments by ARQMOV Workshop, Mexico City, Mexico

This Mexico City apartment building was inspired by the coursing motion of Mexican society and gives form to this dynamic on the building’s façade through the horizontal and vertical grids achieved by the curving bands composed of white vertical battens.

© MICHAN ARCHITECTURE

© MICHAN ARCHITECTURE

© MICHAN ARCHITECTURE

© MICHAN ARCHITECTURE

Social Housing Z53by MAP/MX, Azcapotzalco, Mexico

This social housing project in a neighborhood in Mexico City with a large demand for affordable units is divided into three separate towers with units overlooking courtyards for natural ventilation. The buildings feature traditional red-brick façades that respond to light and shadow and plays with ideas of structure and ornament.

© Migdal Arquitectos

© Migdal Arquitectos

© Migdal Arquitectos

© Migdal Arquitectos

Central Park Interlomas by Migdal Arquitectos, Mexico City, Mexico

This high-rise development on the outskirts of Mexico City sits atop a natural plateau that acts as a podium for a series of 12 towers modeled after urban skylines. The towers are organized around a central garden, while the forms feature cantilevered setbacks and cutouts that form terraces.

© DCPP arquitectos

© DCPP arquitectos

© DCPP arquitectos

© DCPP arquitectos

Antonio Solá Apartmentsby DCPP arquitectos, Mexico City, Mexico

This concrete and glass apartment building features large frontal terraces ringed in vegetation with large open windows. The small plot lets the building blend into its urban context while introducing and maintaining green features.

© ARQMOV WORKSHOP

© ARQMOV WORKSHOP

© ARQMOV WORKSHOP

© ARQMOV WORKSHOP

JUST BEby ARQMOV WORKSHOP, Mexico City, Mexico

Situated at the corner of two bustling streets in a vibrant artistic neighborhood, this apartment building has a wood-lattice screen to protect from noise on one side and a glass curtain wall with a series of balconies on the other side.

© Taller 13 Arquitectura Regenerativa

© Taller 13 Arquitectura Regenerativa

© Taller 13 Arquitectura Regenerativa

© Taller 13 Arquitectura Regenerativa

Nicolas San Juan 27 by Taller 13 Arquitectura Regenerativa, Mexico City, Mexico

This mid-rise apartment building features a structural concrete exoskeleton designed to be both load carrying and resistant to seismic activity. The interwoven pattern over a glass façade gives the building a biological form, while eco-friendly features reduce the building’s carbon footprint.

© Jacob Due

The Wave in Vejle // Henning Larsen

Ved Bølgen, Vejle, Denmark

© Sweco Architects

Umeå Campus Park // Sweco Architects

Umeå, Sweden

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