© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

West Lethbridge Centre Crossings Branch Public Library // SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

Lethbridge, Canada

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Text description provided by the architects.

Lethbridge, Alberta, LEED® Silver Certified.
With one of the largest construction footprints in the City of Lethbridge, the West Lethbridge Centre spans nearly 200,000 sf. and is the epitome of a symbiotic relationship. The substantial $107 million structure is composed of two schools connected by a public library, all sharing a single mechanical plant.

© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

It is the first building of its kind in Southern Alberta and is a singular community landmark. The Centre is part of the West Lethbridge Core Facilities Project and was a joint effort of the City of Lethbridge, School District 51, Holy Spirit Roman Catholic Separate Regional Division No. 4, the Lethbridge Public Library, and other various community stakeholders.

© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

The Crossings Branch Library, designed by SAHURI, has a cantilevered entrance of glass and steel that gives the feeling of a community portal into the complex. The Centre opened in 2010 and had unique technologies applied to it including LEED® design criteria, a common mechanical plant, treated storm water, integrated parks, and recreation and storm management facilities.

© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

Employing collocation and LEED® standards resulted in substantial savings through lower construction and operating costs, and lowered consumption of non-renewable resources..

© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

© SAHURI + Partners Architecture Inc.

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