© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

DRIFTWOOD HUT PROJECT // Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

Okishimacho, Omihachiman, Japan

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Text description provided by the architects.

In recent years, due to the effects of climate change such as heavy rains and sediment disasters, a large amount of driftwood has drifted onto beaches, rivers and lakes. The town of Okishima, a fisherman’s town and the inhabited island of only one Freshwater Lake in Lake Biwa, has a similar problem, and the local government pays for the collection and disposal of driftwood.

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

In the remote island of Okishima, materials are transported by boat during construction, which requires more time and money than on the mainland. In addition, the waste generated on the island is basically not disposed of on the island, but must be transported off the island, which is equally time consuming and expensive.

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

So, using driftwood drifted off the island and unneeded items such as fishing gear from the islanders, he built a resting place on the island. Each time he collected driftwood that had drifted off the shore of the lake, he proceeded with the construction, and with the cooperation of the islanders, he built the building through a student-led workshop.
All of the driftwood is different in shape, with a mixture of hardwoods and softwoods and varying properties.

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

The shape, species, and structural strength of the collected driftwood were examined, and the method of constructing the building was explored by placing the varying driftwood materials in the right places. The model, 3D modeling, structural analysis, etc. were examined at the same time to see what kind of shape would be best.

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

As a result, we left the circular nature in the center and led the dome space by the reciprocal structure that spreads radially from there. No hardware is used at all to join the driftwood together, but rather the fishermen’s technique is applied and it is tied together with a hemp rope in a box.

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

Fishing nets and shade nets were used for the roofing, and hemp rope was used for the flooring. In the future, they will continue to consider thatching some of the roofs with bamboo and reeds that grow on the island. It is a sustainable architecture that can be easily replaced if a part of the architecture decays.
Using materials from the island that people don’t need, he created a new place for people to belong.

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

This project questions the nature of architecture, which aims to encourage the small circulation of resources on the island through human intervention..

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

© Ryuichi Ashizawa +Hirokazu Toki + The University of Shiga Prefecture Ashizawa laboratory

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