© Nathaniel McMahon

Diesel Engine Factory redevelopment // CHIASMUS Partners, Inc

Changchun, China

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Text description provided by the architects.

In many ways the conversion of the old factory site in Changchun is a typical post-industrial redevelopment that includes saving some exemplar buildings and adding contemporary functions. These former factories seldom have a lasting architectural quality, but in spatial and dogmatic organization they represent a defining age in China worth keeping.

Located in North-East China, Changchun – sometimes called the “Detroit of China” because of its automotive industry –has been an important industrial city for the last 100 year.

© Nathaniel McMahon

© Nathaniel McMahon

Standing next to the East expressway the project is on a visually prominent position among a monoculture of new residential towers.

Developed by Vanke to be a flagship project of their Vanke Hills series, the project was constructed in subsequent stages since 2010 with each building developed as an interdependent element.

© Nathaniel McMahon

© Nathaniel McMahon

Representation is found in the materiality of the buildings: steel for the old factory, brick for the offices and plaster for the residential tower. A returning feature is the customized windows with high insulation glass that provide the buildings with a generous amount of daylight inside while deeper indoors intimate spaces allow for more privacy.

© Nathaniel McMahon

© Nathaniel McMahon

This concept complements a variety of spatial qualities and creates comfortable places to work and live..

© Nathaniel McMahon

© Nathaniel McMahon

Diesel Engine Factory redevelopment Gallery

© RISOU

THE TROPIC HOUSE // RISOU

Vietnam

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