© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

Vøringsfossen Waterfall Area // Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

Eidfjord, Norway

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Vøringsfossen is the largest waterfall in Norway and has been a tourist attraction since the early 1800’s. The 182-metre-high waterfall can be seen from several lookout points along the dramatic edge of the deep ravine. Several smaller waterfalls also flow through the site, creating an atmosphere of running water, frightening heights and stunning views.

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

Despite being one of the most visited attractions in Norway, the area has been inaccessible and dangerous, and the scene of several tragic accidents.

New facilities for accessibility, service and safety, have been under construction since 2015, based on the competition proposal from 2009. The complete waterfall park will be finished in 2024.

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

Last year the striking Stair Bridge was mounted, connecting the two sides of the waterfall. Besides the Stair Bridge, the project contains more than one kilometre of fences and railings, lookout platforms, several smaller bridges, two service buildings, and a visitors’ centre with a café and shop..

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

© Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk AS ARKITEKTKONTOR

Vøringsfossen Waterfall Area Gallery

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