© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

Virolai Petit Kindergarten // Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

Barcelona, Spain

Architizer Editors Architizer Editors
Want to see your project featured like this?

Text description provided by the architects.

Team: Vicente Sarrablo, Jaume Colom, Jordi Roviras and Cristina GarcíaThe Virolai Petit kindergarten in Escorial Street, Barcelona, was built for Virolai, a private developer who has long-standing experience in educational centres.Situated at the north end there is a large sports centre, while on all the other sides the school has free façades.

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

A closed façade in Escorial Street protects the building from noise and it opens onto an inner patio with views of green areas at three terraced levels starting from the roof. There are playgrounds on each level, the forged fronts of which improve the orientation of the classrooms. Every floor contains three classrooms with a porch each that give out onto the school patio where educational activities are carried out when the weather is nice.
One of the main ideas of the project was to flee from the typical image of schools with playgrounds on roofs that look like metal cages added on top of buildings.

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

For this reason, the enclosure of the roof playground stretches out as far as the street and its lay-out reminds us of a Florentine palace, including a tripartite division of the façade, in which the classical bossages are now a Flexbrick textile of white ceramic tiles that unifies the three levels: sunscreen, rainscreen and base.
The mixed concrete and ceramic tile panels placed at the base of the building represent an important technical innovation: as the internal reinforcement of the ceramic textile does not contain a concrete perimeter frame, the ceramic pieces can reach the very ends of the panel.

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

This innovation has enabled the continuity of the checkerboard pattern of the textile on the three different parts of the main façade.
The layout of the roof playground is triangle-shaped and consists of the dividing wall of the sports centre, the previously mentioned Flexbrick sunscreen facing Escorial Street and a second sunscreen overlooking the interior of the block.

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

These veils of ceramic textile provide the patio with a protecting shade and filter the urban surroundings while the children are playing outside.
The interior façades of the building are less monumental. Their scale has been adjusted to the size of children. On the ground floor, small cubicles projected towards the patio divide the porches of each classroom into sections and their scale and elevation at mid-height remind us that children feel safer when they can play under a table..

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

© Team Sarrablo / Equipo Sarrablo

Virolai Petit Kindergarten Gallery

© Mariela Apollonio

Cottage in the Vineyard // Ramon Esteve Estudio

Fontanars dels Alforins, Spain

How LAUFEN Created a Custom Toilet for Herzog & de Meuron’s “Jeng a Tower”

Second- and third-generation toilet artisans have perfected ceramics at the Swiss manufacturer.

+