© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

Villa No. 30 // Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

Iran

Architizer Editors Architizer Editors

Text description provided by the architects.

Villa No 30 is located one hour drive west from Iran’s capital, Tehran, in a 28000 square feet lot, surrounded by other single family villa houses. Despite a relatively generous lot, the villa is designed within the 800 square feet permitted footprint, in order to comply with the applicable zoning by-laws.

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

In response to the footprint restrictions, the design of the villa is inspired by what many believe to be the very fundamental essence of architecture: Providing shelter.
The roof of the villa is designed as a continuous surface which shelters the core glass structure of the building, and provides sun shade on the south side.

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

The roof is sloped on the north side, in order to harvest the rainwater towards the exterior planters around the pool area.
The back painted glass panels on the façad create a sense of invisible structure and mirror the adjacent landscape and trees. The material palette is consistent throughout the interior and exterior of the villa, eliminating the border between the outdoor and indoor spaces and extending the experience of architectural space beyond the perimeter of the 80 square meter ground floor.
On the inside, it’s the outside that dominates.

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

The interior space is always a part of the changing seasons that play out in the surrounding area. Floor-to-ceiling glass panels help eliminate the boundary between inside and out.
The design intent for the ground floor level was to embrace various functions in one open living area, surrounded by an elevated exterior wooden deck which functions as an extension of interior spaces and activities.

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

As one ascends to the upper level, which is mainly composed of bedrooms and additional bathrooms, the void spaces adjacent to stair allow the light travel between different levels of the villa and also provide a visual and physical link.

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© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

© Saeed Mirmohamad Sadeghi & Ladan Zarei

Villa No. 30 Gallery

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