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The Natural Unnatural // Clark Richardson Architects

Austin, TX, United States

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Text description provided by the architects.

A hidden network of inlets, storm drains, and ultimately the Waller Creek dig project tunnels are Unnatural controls creating a city-wide water displacement grid. This concealed system seeks to control the Natural processes of torrential rain storms allowing for our habitation of this flood prone land. Flowing water can be graceful and seductive, but it can also be grotesque and terrifying.

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

Perspective defines how we see this relationship, and as we alter the built landscape, this perspective changes. This installation intended to make visible the tenuous relationship between the Natural chaos of water in an impervious urban environment during a large rain event and the structured Unnatural order of the manmade devices attempting to control and direct it.

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

As a public art piece the Natural Unnatural, draws awareness, encourages public excitement and participation in the re-habilitation of the Waller Creek as the COA completes the staggering and largely invisible Waller Creek Tunnel Dig Project below downtown Austin. See the architectural video of the installation here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uT-vGFISDHo.

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

© paul finkel / pistondesign.com

The Natural Unnatural Gallery

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