Qianhai Floating City // People’s Architecture Office

Shenzhen, China

Architizer Editors Architizer Editors
Want to see your project featured like this?

 

Text description provided by the architects.

The Qianhai Floating City activates a barren site with the use of an open spatial framework. Conceived and realized during the Covid-19 pandemic, a time of heightened uncertainty, the project is an expression of how urban space can quickly adapt to changing needs. The project is a flexible framework comprised of rented scaffolding.

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

This structural system can be easily constructed, altered, and disassembled without waste.Qianhai Floating City served as the “Instant City” section of the 2020 Qianhai Future Urbanism/Architecture Exhibition. This show explored new models for city planning based on public participation and bottom-up practices. Such approaches are in contrast to the top-down urban planning that is the convention in Shenzhen, where Qianhai is located.

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

The design of the Qianhai Floating City was a collective effort and the result of discussions between exhibition participants. The structure hosted a range of shifting programs, including movie screenings, lectures, workshops and other public events. Visitors could traverse the Floating City’s colorful pathways to explore various embedded artwork. And guests were offered encompassing views of the city as they inhabited the three-dimensional grid.

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

© People's Architecture Office

Qianhai Floating City Gallery

© Stantec

Isttaniokaksini/Science Commons – University of Lethbridge // St antec

Lethbridge, Canada

One Drawing Challenge 2021: Send Us a Drawing. Tell Us a Story. Win $2 ,500!

The One Drawing Challenge returns with a simple but provocative question: Can you tell a powerful st ory about architecture with a single drawing?

+