© TTAT

Porcelana Slaska Park office building 2 // TTAT

Katowice, Poland

Architizer Editors Architizer Editors

Text description provided by the architects.

The office building of the Porcelana Slaska Park is located in the area of the historical porcelain factory in the industrial part of Katowice. The post-factory buildings are located here and this is where the widely known porcelain signed “Giesche” and later “Bogucice” was manufactured since the 1920s. The post- industrial building complex is considered to be a space of high architectural value.

© TTAT

© TTAT

The technological park that has been established here includes: offices, a design centre, an exhibition area, a workroom for creative industries, an IT research laboratory, a design laboratory, as well as cafés and restaurants. New functions of the buildings aim at reviving the area.
Such a great undertaking required a clear organization of functions associated with the project.

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

The site can be divided into three separate areas: vicinities of two office buildings of the Silesian Porcelain Park and post-factory building complex. Due to the accepted project specifications concerning the collaborative functioning of these three areas, a transportation hub has been designed. The hub connects the areas of the site, thus providing a clear system of communication between specific buildings.

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

Near the converted buildings, which function as offices, and the post-factory buildings the entrance area was designed, forming a natural vestibule that makes the buildings more prominent. The designed hub connects the entrance areas, thus joins the buildings into one functioning complex.
The converted building is a small facility that used to function as stables, and later as a warehouse.

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

Despite the separate function and localization on the site, it still shares the post-industrial style with other buildings of the historical factory, which before were directly connected with porcelain production. The original brick structure ofthe walls and open wood-and-steel roof framework constitute its architectural value. Considering the value of the factory, we have decided that the external architecture of the buildings will not be changed.

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

Treating the outer walls and the roof of the building as a shell, our aim was to ensure that the facility remains unaltered in its design, thus emphasizing the fact that it is an integral part of the other buildings of the post-factory complex. The programme and functional assumptions of the design presented by the investor quickly determined the required cubic capacity of the converted building.

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

It was necessary to increase it. Construction of an additional storey or any kind of building extension wouldchange the design and external architecture of the building. The principle that had been undertaken by us earlier excluded this type of action. In order to fulfil the investor’s expectations, we decided to expand the cubic capacity within the confines of the existing walls by lowering the floor by one level, thus creating a two storey area.

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

The character of the existing elements of the construction such as brick walls, wooden framework, or steel girders remained unaltered. The new function – office and conference rooms – was formed within the existing shell. In the converted stable buildings, a new space was created by joining the existing architecture and new functions.

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

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© Tomasz Zakrzewski

© Tomasz Zakrzewski

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