© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

Myrto House // Vakis Associates | architects + designers

Nicosia

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Text description provided by the architects.

This is an exercise to make this two storey building appear as a single storey by placing the first floor on top of a ground floor stone plinth on the street side, hiding all ground floor activities. At the same time extensive shaded glazing on the garden and pool side is creating a horizontal void directly connecting and unifying the indoors with the outdoors.

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

The combination of the heavy stone base and the continuous glazing makes the curved concrete structure on the first floor appear to be floating. The elevated site has unobstructed views to the Pentedaktylos mountains during the day and the lights of Nicosia town at night. The open space between the guest bedroom and living room creates a sheltered outdoor sitting area with an open fire.

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

The plan is linear and all rooms share the same stunning views..

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

© Vakis Associates | architects + designers

Myrto House Gallery

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