© Yasunori Shimomura

House in Ikoma // Arbol Design

Ikoma, Japan

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Text description provided by the architects.

Double height ceiling space at earth floor connects the entire rooms and the familyThe request of the clients was earth floor, and a spacious open place like studio, as they’d like to feel sense of unity as a family.To meet these needs, entrance, earth floor, and stairs have double height structure, and the ceiling height is set in 6700mm.

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

Furthermore, a glass window is placed above the stair space, and its width is same as earth floor one, so that the sunlight comes in well through that wide open window. The aim of this design is for wind, natural sunlight, and air to run through the whole area freely and effectively, in this compact house.
Because of this design, some parts of the beams appear, so as to enjoy the strength of wood structure, and its grain change as time goes by.
As this house is located at a developed land of Ikoma mountain, equipment for cold weather is essential.

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

To have a warm living room, polycarbonate material is used at earth floor and stair space.
Floor heating is set at the both earth floor and living floor.
As for kitchen equipment, a specific business use model was selected by the client. The exterior shape is square, and simple. Gable roof is placed through north to south.
The house is on the hill, looking down over the scenery, wrapping the inside family gently and softly..

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

© Yasunori Shimomura

House in Ikoma Gallery

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© James Morris

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