© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

GHOST HANGAR // JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

TX, United States

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Text description provided by the architects.

In a design for Lewis Air Legends – a living museum of Vintage WWII era aircraft whose mission is “to preserve their memory while honoring their bravery and sacrifice. To bring the thrill of their incredible flying machines – and those they fought against – to as many people as possible in a truly international display of historic airpower.” The client charged the architect with designing a structure that was era- appropriate to the pristine, fully operational aircraft.

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

Located in the Texas Hill Country, the site and program presented a unique design intersection – Aviation and Texas Ranching. The Quonset hut, a WWII archetype, provided a form silhouette that mitigated and minimized the buildings impact on the landscape and horizon. Selecting a triangulated wide-flange barrel-vault structural system, connected through a series of knuckles, the building is able achieve longer spans while the dropping curve brings the expansive roof back down to the ground.

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

The spring line-to-saddlebag connection provides the necessary vertical clearance, as well as further fragmentation of the longest facades, breaking up what would typically be an expansive, uninterrupted face – a feature common of the hangar archetype, and undesired by the client.

The material palette was carefully assembled as an extension of, and to integrate with, the surrounding ranch landscape.

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

Selecting reclaimed materials that were pre-weathered and ready to handle the climate, and new materials that carry inherit durability were a priority. Allowing for ample natural light, upcycled HVAC, and natural and mechanical ventilation round out this building’s response to Texas’ harsh climate.
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© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

© JOHN GRABLE ARCHITECTS

GHOST HANGAR Gallery

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