The New Normal? AD-APT Modifies Your Apartment for Any Activity

AD-APT gives residents the power to adapt their apartments for living, working and playing.

Nathaniel Bahadursingh Nathaniel Bahadursingh

Architects: Showcase your next project through Architizer and sign up for our inspirational newsletter.

As the world continues to adapt to COVID–19, the lifestyles of most individuals have been rendered sedentary. The home is now the site of every facet of life, from rest and sustenance to work and entertainment. Given this unprecedented reality, the architecture of most living spaces is not formed to accommodate all of these activities. In response, Australian architectural practice Woods Bagot has developed a solution for this dilemma: A modular system that can adapt apartments to support a range of activities throughout the day.

Called AD-APT, the system includes a series of adjustable walls and screens that would be used to segment an open-plan apartment into various dedicated spaces. These spaces would include a home office, exercise room, entertainment area and bedrooms. According to Woods Bagot, life in quarantine has made individuals realize that some of their daily activities aren’t strictly attached to certain locations. 

The “Day Mode” arrangement, which is configured to provide a generous living and dining space.

For some, this situation has highlighted a degree of spatial flexibility. Moving forward, it’s feasible that “people will choose their location based on their tasks and activities, not on where their company leases an office,” state the architects. “We see this leading to the need for resilient homes, homes with the adaptability to support a range of activities throughout people’s days.”

Woods Bagot highlighted and labelled two of the most common ways people work from home. The first is the Split Shift Home, which is designed for a couple with children. It imagines one parent working during a morning shift, while the other cares for the children. In the afternoon, they switch. The second is the Double Desk Home, which would be occupied by roommates that share a dining table, kitchen bench or coffee table as makeshift desks. 

The “Night Mode” arrangement, in which the living room is compressed to create a significant master suite and second bedroom.

AD-APT’s design includes an entry hallway, which would create space for storage. The remainder of the apartment would be formed by two moveable booths and a fixed bathroom unit. Throughout the space, there would be a number of storage and space-saving solutions, such as furniture that folds out from the walls. The design also includes a large balcony that would offer space for outdoor exercise and entertainment. 

The “Play Mode” arrangement, where the apartment is transformed into a wide open space for entertainment.

Woods Bagot provided renderings of AD-APT in three different arrangements that correspond to certain times of the day. The first is “Day Mode”, which is configured to provide a generous living/dining space and a separated kitchen and work space, with two additional booths as support spaces. Next is “Night Mode”, in which the living room is compressed to create a significant master suite and second bedroom. Finally there’s “Play Mode”, where the apartment is transformed into a wide open space for entertaining large groups of people, when people can safely gather again.

Woods Bagot’s AD-APT presents an inventive approach to forming adaptable spaces that can accommodate all activities. COVID–19 or not, AD-APT addresses the growing flexibility many individuals desire in determining where they live, work and play.

All images via Woods Bagot

Architects: Showcase your next project through Architizer and sign up for our inspirational newsletter.

+